Replay Art

I’ve been looking for this film for AGES – but I thought it was made in Drive not Trackmania Sunrise – color me stupid, huh?! Anyhoo – it’s just stunning to look at!

Still beautiful.

I actually caught both these videos from a conversation between Jerry and Mark (WelloHorld) on Twitter.

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A seven minute tour of virtual worlds

Personalize Media has a video out with a summary of the virtual worlds out there. Far from all are included! Most of these are non-game social worlds and there’s loads that I haven’t even heard of! I was suprised to see A Tale in the Desert there, though. For one, I thought they definitely qualified as a game and second because I thought their numbers were so low that they wouldn’t survive. A Tale in the Desert is a great idea – and I’m so incredibly happy that they’re still alive! That really is good news.

Stolen from Raph Koster’s blog.

Thoughts on analysing Machinima – part 1

I’m not a big fan of the notion that machinima will replace the art of animation. Machinima is something completely different, in my opinion. Like Henry Lowood says:

“It is important to recall that the origins of machinima lie not in content production, but in gameplay” (Lowood, 2006 in Video Games and Art)

It is something that has evolved from high-performance gameplay to brilliant meaningful content, but the essence is still gameplay. The ability to master a game so well that you can bend it and form it into your own mold of content, your own story, your own expression.

Dr. Lowood again:

“Depicting machinima as high-performance play stems from its emergence from inter-relationships of play, spectatorship, technical virtuosity and storytelling in computer games. Each of these factors played a role in defining the practices of machinima as practices of game performance.”(Lowood, 2006, Video Games and Art)

So how should we go about deconstructed machinima, finding it’s meaning, it’s aura – it’s true art?

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